Well­ness Arti­cles

Back­pack Safety is Back-​to-​School Issue

Con­cern over chil­dren and their back­packs con­tin­ues to grow. An arti­cle appear­ing in the Sep­tem­ber 8, 2003 issue of The Times Her­ald fea­tures this prob­lem by not­ing “Trudg­ing their way around the school cam­pus or to the bus stop, hunched-​over kids could be deal­ing them­selves a life­time of back pain, experts warn.”

The US Con­sumer Prod­uct Safety Com­mis­sion esti­mates that 6,512 emer­gency room vis­its each year result from injuries related to book bags. CPSC also cites the sta­tis­tic that backpack-​related injuries are up 256 per­cent since 1996. The issue has become so wide­spread, that the Cal­i­for­nia State Assem­bly passed leg­is­la­tion that forces school dis­tricts to develop ways of reduc­ing the weight of stu­dents’ back­packs. Other states are also con­sid­er­ing sim­i­lar legislation.

In an online sur­vey con­ducted last year of more than 200 chi­ro­prac­tors respond­ing from across North Amer­ica at www​.back​pack​safe​.com, it was learned that:

  • 89 per­cent of chi­ro­prac­tors sur­veyed responded that they have seen patients (ages 518) report­ing back, neck or shoul­der pain caused by heavy backpacks.
  • 71 per­cent of chi­ro­prac­tors presently see­ing such patients responded that they are cur­rently see­ing one to four patients (ages 518) report­ing back, neck or shoul­der pain caused by heavy backpacks.
  • 20 per­cent of chi­ro­prac­tors presently see­ing such patients responded that they are cur­rently see­ing five to nine patients (ages 518) report­ing back, neck or shoul­der pain caused by heavy backpacks.
  • 9 per­cent of chi­ro­prac­tors presently see­ing such patients responded that they are cur­rently see­ing 10 or more patients (ages 518) due to back, neck or shoul­der caused by heavy backpacks.

The Amer­i­can Chi­ro­prac­tic Asso­ci­a­tion has offered the fol­low­ing tips to help pre­vent back­pack prob­lems in school chil­dren. Those tips include:

  • Make sure your child’s back­pack weighs no more than 5 to 10 per­cent of his or her body weight.
  • The back­pack should never hang more than four inches below the waistline.
  • Urge your child to wear both shoul­der straps, and wide, padded straps are very important.
  • The shoul­der straps should be adjustable so the back­pack can be fit­ted to your child’s body.

The over-​packing of back­packs was fea­tured in a recent study con­ducted in Italy. In this study it was found that the aver­age child car­ries a back­pack that would be the equiv­a­lent of a 39-​pound bur­den for a 176-​pound man, or a 29-​pound load for a 132-​pound woman.

Ran­dom Article

brain-body-connectionThurs­day, 22 May 2014, 1:28 pm
Press Release: NZ Col­lege of Chi­ro­prac­tic
22nd May 2014

Chi­ro­prac­tic Care May Reduce Gym and Fitness-​Related Injuries, Say NZ Researchers

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